Siargao, So Tropical

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"I wouldn't want to influence you," he said.

On the first evening, enjoying the alfresco setting at La Carinderia, one of the quaint independent establishments dotted along a part of General Luna, I overheard this conversation between two tourists meeting over for dinner. One seemed quite familiar with the town, while the other, new to the unknown, sought recommendations. "I wouldn't want to influence you," he answered. The warm days and balmy nights we spent traversing through Siargao were indeed guided by a certain kind of influence, mostly knowledge of kind locals whom we have met along the way.

Stopping in the middle of the narrow street on the way back to Blauset House II, a few nights after, managing the bumpy ride on the Honda Mio we've rented from one of the locals, shadows of palm trees wrapped the edges of the cloudless celestial sky—a panorama so new and mesmerising to my vision. We turned off the engine to enjoy the quiet and the full starry night, filled with appreciation for the unexpected of the unexpected.